Rosacea Myths

Rosacea Myths

Rosacea is a common skin condition that affects 1 in 10 people in the UK and contrary to popular belief, it isn’t caused by drinking a bottle of wine every night. It doesn’t only affect women over 60 and nor is it only characterised by redness or swollen veins. In order to separate the fact from the fiction, an expert dermatologist clears up some of the rosacea myths.

MYTH 1: ROSACEA ONLY AFFECTS HEAVY DRINKERS

Despite the common rosacea heavy drinker stereotype, rosacea is actually most common between the ages of 30-60 years in fair-skinned individuals. It also affects women more than men. Alcohol can trigger flare-ups in some people but it doesn’t cause the skin condition.

MYTH 2: ONLY OLDER PEOPLE SUFFER FROM ROSACEA

Rosacea is more common after the age of 30. Usually, the symptoms are intermittent but over the years skin changes such as redness may become fixed until they are present all the time.

MYTH 3: ROSACEA’S ONLY SYMPTOMS ARE RED CHEEKS OR A RED NOSE

Other symptoms of rosacea can be spots, flushing, visible blood vessels and occasional burning or stinging sensation or skin sensitivity. The skin, particularly of the nose, may thicken with time. Approximately 50% of people with rosacea suffer from Ocular Rosacea which affects the eyes, causing irritation, styes or swollen eyelids.

MYTH 4: ROSACEA IS CAUSED BY POOR HYGIENE

Rosacea is a chronic, inflammatory skin disorder predominantly affecting the face. Rosacea can occur due to a number of different factors; eating spicy food and drinking red wine can trigger a flushing response as well as UV light and wind which act as reddening triggers. Poor hygiene doesn’t cause rosacea.

MYTH 5: ROSACEA IS THE SAME AS ACNE

Rosacea was previously known as ‘acne rosacea’, however, acne and rosacea are two different unrelated skin conditions.

MYTH 6: ROSACEA IS CONTAGIOUS

Rosacea isn’t considered contagious or infectious. You will not catch it from coming into contact with someone else that has it. Rosacea, can, however, run in families.


So there are some rosacea myths for you. If you would like to have your skin correctly and precisely assessed, we recommend visiting a skin specialist at your nearest Accredited Treatment Centre.

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