Acne-Rosacea Is NOT A Thing

Mirror mirror on the wall, what is the biggest skin myth of them all?┬áSo-called ‘Acne-Rosacea’ that’s what!

For those of you who aren’t aware, Acne-Rosacea is essentially the Loch Ness Monster of skin; never proven to exist, never even seen by the human eye, and yet believed in by so many that you could be rewarded with all the riches in Scotland just for finding it…well maybe that last part doesn’t apply to Acne-Rosacea, but there have been so many people who have thrown their money at ‘cures’ and ‘treatments’ for it, that it would add up to quite a fortune.

We can definitively say, without any shadow of a doubt, that there is no such thing, it is a complete and utter fairy tale. The trouble is, those who believe in it don’t often get a happy ending…

But where did this myth come from? And why do so many people believe in it?

Well, historically the term was first used when describing type II rosacea, otherwise known as Papulopustular Rosacea, a subtype of the condition where the sufferer develops spots or pustules on their skin following a period of flushing or concurrent flushing. The fact that these spots can look a lot like acne is what coined the term acne-rosacea, implying that the two conditions were linked.

Papulopustular Rosacea

Despite the fact that it has been medically proven for some time, there is no connection between type II rosacea and acne, this term continues to crop up, both in out-dated medical literature and misinformed reports to this day, reinforcing the public perception of this imaginary condition, and keeping this skin myth alive. This has led to any sufferers with type II rosacea to self-diagnose themselves with ‘Acne-Rosacea’, or just plain acne, causing them to seek treatment in all the wrong places.

While acne and rosacea do share some common symptoms, we must remember that these are different conditions and as such require different treatments – otherwise, you won’t see the results you expect, at best leaving you disappointed, at worst exacerbating your symptoms even further.

Of course, there are those who can develop more than one sub-type of rosacea, or suffer from other skin conditions like acne at the same time, making it difficult to know what treatment is best for your skin. Blackheads only occur in acne, so if your symptoms only involve reddening and pustules, it’s likely to be rosacea, if you have blackheads as well, it could be a combination of the two. However, if you’re having trouble figuring out what’s going on with your skin, or aren’t seeing the results you want from the treatment you’re using, we recommend you pay a visit to your GP, to get yourself properly diagnosed and make sure you’re using the right products for your skin.

Once you know what you’re up against, you can start making informed decisions about what’s right for you, and get yourself on the right track to achieving clear skin.

At the ARA UK, we are here to support you by providing professional advice and referrals to clinics near you, who can help you get the best treatment and results possible. So forget the impossible standards, you deserve to feel beautiful in your own skin, rosacea or no rosacea, acne or no acne, and that is why we are here!

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